Book Review: All We Ever Wanted

Book Review: All We Ever WantedAll We Ever Wanted
by Emily Giffin
on June 26, 2018
Pages: 400
Published by Ballantine Books
Genres: Fiction, Women's Fiction
Goodreads

In the riveting new novel from the #1 New York Times bestselling author of First Comes Love and Something Borrowed, three very different people must choose between their family and their values.

Nina Browning is living the good life after marrying into Nashville’s elite. More recently, her husband made a fortune selling his tech business, and their adored son has been accepted to Princeton. Yet sometimes the middle-class small-town girl in Nina wonders if she’s strayed from the person she once was.

Tom Volpe is a single dad working multiple jobs while struggling to raise his headstrong daughter, Lyla. His road has been lonely, long, and hard, but he finally starts to relax after Lyla earns a scholarship to Windsor Academy, Nashville’s most prestigious private school.

Amid so much wealth and privilege, Lyla doesn’t always fit in—and her overprotective father doesn’t help—but in most ways, she’s a typical teenaged girl, happy and thriving.

Then, one photograph, snapped in a drunken moment at a party, changes everything. As the image spreads like wildfire, the Windsor community is instantly polarized, buzzing with controversy and assigning blame.

At the heart of the lies and scandal, Tom, Nina, and Lyla are forced together—all questioning their closest relationships, asking themselves who they really are, and searching for the courage to live a life of true meaning.

My Takeaway

Emily Giffin is one of my all-time favorite authors. I just adore this woman!! I have read all her books and get thrilled when a new one comes out. I was lucky enough to win an advanced reading copy from Bookish First – so yay for me! I enjoyed All We Ever Wanted and felt it had the right amount of drama, secrets, and scandal. We know teenagers are capable of foolish behavior — especially if/or alcohol is involved. In this case, a teen committed an offensive act and must deal with the consequences. However, the novel also dealt with racism, values, class, and parenting. I found it interesting how parenting styles varied tremendously from person to person. I also appreciated that Giffin offered the viewpoints of three people: Nina, Tom, and Lyla, because I knew each one’s thoughts and secrets. I think this would be a great book for young adults because of the themes it deals with (underage drinking, relationships, social media, etc).

A huge thanks to Bookish First, Ballantine Books and NetGalley for advanced copies of the book in exchange for an honest review.

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