Book Review: It’s Always the Husband

Book Review: It’s Always the HusbandIt's Always the Husband
by Michele Campbell
on January 1st 1970
Pages: 320
Published by St. Martin's Press
Genres: Mystery/Crime, Suspense/Thriller
Goodreads

Kate, Aubrey, and Jenny. They first met as college roommates and soon became inseparable, even though they are as different as three women can be. Twenty years later, one of them is standing at the edge of a bridge ... and someone else is urging her to jump.

How did things come to this?

As the novel cuts back and forth between their college years and their adult years, you see the exact reasons why these women love and hate each other—but can feelings that strong lead to murder? Or will everyone assume, as is often the case, that it’s always the husband?

My Takeaway I gobbled up this novel in one day! Although, the first half of the story moved a bit slow (hardly any suspense), the second half moved at an enjoyable, faster pace. From the beginning, it is obvious the Whipple Triplets (as they are known in college) have drastically…

Bookworm in the Know

In my previous blog site (I recently moved from Weebly to WordPress), I posted a weekly series, Bookworm in the Know. It is just a simple way of keeping everyone in the loop of what I’m reading and of bookish events and/or news. I will do my…

Book Review: The Refugees

Book Review: The RefugeesThe Refugees
by Viet Thanh Nguyen
on February 7th 2017
Pages: 224
Published by Grove Press
Genres: Literary Fiction, Multicultural, Short Stories
Goodreads

With the coruscating gaze that informed The Sympathizer, in The Refugees Viet Thanh Nguyen gives voice to lives led between two worlds, the adopted homeland and the country of birth. From a young Vietnamese refugee who suffers profound culture shock when he comes to live with two gay men in San Francisco, to a woman whose husband is suffering from dementia and starts to confuse her for a former lover, to a girl living in Ho Chi Minh City whose older half-sister comes back from America having seemingly accomplished everything she never will, the stories are a captivating testament to the dreams and hardships of immigration.

This second piece of fiction by a major new voice in American letters, The Refugees is a beautifully written and sharply observed book about the aspirations of those who leave one country for another, and the relationships and desires for self-fulfillment that define our lives.

My Takeaway  “For all refugees, everywhere” – Dedication in The Refugees “In a country where possessions counted for everything, we had no belongings except our stories.”  Viet Thanh Nguyen, The Refugees Holy moly! What an incredible, emotional and remarkable book! I am honestly having a hard time coming up with the…

Milk and Honey Review

Milk and Honey ReviewMilk and Honey
by Rupi Kaur
on November 4th 2014
Pages: 204
Published by Createspace
Genres: Poetry
Goodreads

milk and honey is a collection of poetry and prose about survival. It is about the experience of violence, abuse, love, loss, and femininity. It is split into four chapters, and each chapter serves a different purpose, deals with a different pain, heals a different heartache. milk and honey takes readers through a journey of the most bitter moments in life and finds sweetness in them because there is sweetness everywhere if you are just willing to look.

This little poetry book is a gem!! Kaur’s poems inspired me to write a haiku as my review. Short book of poems Has me in awe and thinking Of loss, life, and love &nbsp…

Book Review: Wonder

Book Review: WonderWonder
by R.J. Palacio
on February 14th 2012
Pages: 316
Published by Knopf
Genres: Young Readers
Goodreads

I won't describe what I look like. Whatever you're thinking, it's probably worse.

August (Auggie) Pullman was born with a facial deformity that prevented him from going to a mainstream school—until now. He's about to start 5th grade at Beecher Prep, and if you've ever been the new kid then you know how hard that can be. The thing is Auggie's just an ordinary kid, with an extraordinary face. But can he convince his new classmates that he's just like them, despite appearances?

R. J. Palacio has written a spare, warm, uplifting story that will have readers laughing one minute and wiping away tears the next. With wonderfully realistic family interactions (flawed, but loving), lively school scenes, and short chapters, Wonder is accessible to readers of all levels.

My Takeaway  “You can’t blend in when you were born to stand out.” R.J. Palacio Wonder is one of those books that stays with you long after you’ve read it. It is one of my favorite books. I recommend it wholeheartedly to both…