Book Review: Where the Red Fern Grows

Book Review: Where the Red Fern GrowsWhere the Red Fern Grows
by Wilson Rawls
on September 17, 1996
Pages: 212
Published by Yearling Books
Genres: Fiction, Young Readers
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Billy has long dreamt of owning not one, but two dogs. So when he’s finally able to save up enough money for two pups to call his own—Old Dan and Little Ann—he’s ecstatic. It’s true that times are tough, but together they’ll roam the hills of the Ozarks.

Soon Billy and his hounds become the finest hunting team in the valley. Stories of their great achievements spread throughout the region, and the combination of Old Dan’s brawn, Little Ann’s brains, and Billy’s sheer will seems unbeatable. But tragedy awaits these determined hunters—now friends—and Billy learns that hope can grow out of despair.

My Takeaway “It’s not easy for a young boy to want a dog and not be able to have one.” Wilson Rawls, Where the Red Fern Grows As a girl, I never had the opportunity to read Where the Red Fern Grows, but thanks to The…

Book Review: The Origin of Others

Book Review: The Origin of OthersThe Origin of Others
by Toni Morrison, Ta-Nehisi Coates
on September 18, 2017
Pages: 131
Published by Harvard University Press
Genres: Non-Fiction
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America's foremost novelist reflects on the themes that preoccupy her work and increasingly dominate national and world politics: race, fear, borders, the mass movement of peoples, the desire for belonging. What is race and why does it matter? What motivates the human tendency to construct Others? Why does the presence of Others make us so afraid?

Drawing on her Norton Lectures, Toni Morrison takes up these and other vital questions bearing on identity in The Origin of Others. In her search for answers, the novelist considers her own memories as well as history, politics, and especially literature. Harriet Beecher Stowe, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Flannery O'Connor, and Camara Laye are among the authors she examines. Readers of Morrison's fiction will welcome her discussions of some of her most celebrated books--Beloved, Paradise, and A Mercy.

If we learn racism by example, then literature plays an important part in the history of race in America, both negatively and positively. Morrison writes about nineteenth-century literary efforts to romance slavery, contrasting them with the scientific racism of Samuel Cartwright and the banal diaries of the plantation overseer and slaveholder Thomas Thistlewood. She looks at configurations of blackness, notions of racial purity, and the ways in which literature employs skin color to reveal character or drive narrative. Expanding the scope of her concern, she also addresses globalization and the mass movement of peoples in this century. National Book Award winner Ta-Nehisi Coates provides a foreword to Morrison's most personal work of nonfiction to date.

My Takeaway “How does one become a racist, a sexist? Since no one is born a racist and there is no fetal predisposition to sexism, one learns Othering not by lecture or instruction but by example.” Toni Morrison, The Origin of Others What is race and why does it matter…

Book Review: The Dry

Book Review: The DryThe Dry (Aaron Falk, #1)
by Jane Harper
on January 10, 2017
Pages: 326
Published by Flatiron Books
Genres: Fiction, Mystery/Crime, Suspense/Thriller
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A small town hides big secrets in this atmospheric, page-turning debut mystery by an award-winning new author.

After getting a note demanding his presence, Federal Agent Aaron Falk arrives in his hometown for the first time in decades to attend the funeral of his best friend, Luke. Twenty years ago when Falk was accused of murder, Luke was his alibi. Falk and his father fled under a cloud of suspicion, saved from prosecution only because of Luke’s steadfast claim that the boys had been together at the time of the crime. But now more than one person knows they didn’t tell the truth back then, and Luke is dead.

Amid the worst drought in a century, Falk and the local detective question what really happened to Luke. As Falk reluctantly investigates to see if there’s more to Luke’s death than there seems to be, long-buried mysteries resurface, as do the lies that have haunted them. And Falk will find that small towns have always hidden big secrets.

My Takeaway “The rumors were fed well . . . and grew fat and solid. They sprouted legs and heads, and they never died.” Jane Harper, The Dry I had high hopes for The Dry and in the end, I did not love it, but I did not hate it either. Harper is…

The Great American Read

I’m so excited and I just can’t hide it!! The Great American Read finally premiered last night!! WOOHOO!! What is The Great American Read? It is an eight-part series that explores and celebrates the power of reading, told through the prism of America’s 100…

Book Review: The House of the Spirits

Book Review: The House of the SpiritsLa Casa de Los Espiritus
by Isabel Allende
on January 3, 2017
Pages: 560
Published by Vintage Espanol
Genres: Libros en Español, Literary Fiction, Magical Realism, Multicultural
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In one of the most important and beloved Latin American works of the twentieth century, Isabel Allende weaves a luminous tapestry of three generations of the Trueba family, revealing both triumphs and tragedies.

Here is patriarch Esteban, whose wild desires and political machinations are tempered only by his love for his ethereal wife, Clara, a woman touched by an otherworldly hand. Their daughter, Blanca, whose forbidden love for a man Esteban has deemed unworthy infuriates her father, yet will produce his greatest joy: his granddaughter Alba, a beautiful, ambitious girl who will lead the family and their country into a revolutionary future.

The House of the Spirits is an enthralling saga that spans decades and lives, twining the personal and the political into an epic novel of love, magic, and fate.

Mi Punto de Vista “Esa noche creí que había perdido para siempre la capacidad de enamorarme, que nunca más podría reírme ni perseguir una ilusión. Pero nunca más es mucho tiempo.” La casa de los espíritus, Isabel Allende La casa de los esp…