Bookish News

Hi, fellow bookworms!! I have been a busy bee reading, reviewing and attending lots of book events. Loving it! I am lucky to live in an area bursting with book lovers. The DC area has some outstanding independent bookstores. These wonderful bookstores are continuously bringing authors and hosting impressive book…

Book Review: Our Little Secret

Book Review: Our Little SecretOur Little Secret
by Roz Nay
on April 17, 2018
Pages: 272
Published by St. Martin's Press
Genres: Fiction, Suspense/Thriller
Goodreads

Roz Nay's Our Little Secret is a twisted tale of love, pain, and revenge that will stay with the reader long after they turn the last page.

They say you never forget your first love. What they don't say though, is that sometimes your first love won't forget you...

A police interview room is the last place Angela expected to find herself today. It's been hours, and they keep asking her the same inane questions over and over. "How do you know the victim?" "What's your relationship with Mr. Parker?" Her ex's wife has gone missing, and anyone who was close to the couple is a suspect. Angela is tired of the bottomless questions and tired of the cold room that stays the same while a rotating litany of interrogators changes shifts around her. But when criminologist Novak takes over, she can tell he's not like the others. He's ready to listen, and she knows he'll understand. When she tells him that her story begins a decade before, long before Saskia was in the picture, he gives her the floor.

A twenty-something young professional, Angela claims to have no involvement. How could she? It's been years since she and H.P., Mr. Parker that is, were together. As her story unfolds, it deepens and darkens. There's a lot to unpack... betrayal, jealousy, and a group of people who all have motives for retribution. If Angela is telling the truth, then who's lying?

My Takeaway “The detective wants to know what happened to Saskia as if I could just skip to the ending and all would be well. But stories begin at the beginning and some secrets have to be earned”. Roz Nay, Our Little Secret Our Little Secret, is twisted…

Book Review: The Poet X

Book Review: The Poet XThe Poet X
by Elizabeth Acevedo
on March 6, 2018
Pages: 357
Published by HarperTeen
Genres: Poetry, Young Adult
Goodreads

A young girl in Harlem discovers slam poetry as a way to understand her mother’s religion and her own relationship to the world. Debut novel of renowned slam poet Elizabeth Acevedo.

Xiomara Batista feels unheard and unable to hide in her Harlem neighborhood. Ever since her body grew into curves, she has learned to let her fists and her fierceness do the talking.

But Xiomara has plenty she wants to say, and she pours all her frustration and passion onto the pages of a leather notebook, reciting the words to herself like prayers—especially after she catches feelings for a boy in her bio class named Aman, who her family can never know about. With Mami’s determination to force her daughter to obey the laws of the church, Xiomara understands that her thoughts are best kept to herself.

So when she is invited to join her school’s slam poetry club, she doesn’t know how she could ever attend without her mami finding out, much less speak her words out loud. But still, she can’t stop thinking about performing her poems.

Because in the face of a world that may not want to hear her, Xiomara refuses to be silent.

My Takeaway “Pero, tú no eres fácil.” You sure ain’t an easy one.” Elizabeth Acevedo, The Poet X ¡Mira muchacha (Look girl) — your book kept me up until 1:30am! Pero (but), I’m not complaining because it was sooo worth losing a few hours of…

Book Review: Notes from a Public Typewriter

Book Review: Notes from a Public TypewriterNotes from a Public Typewriter
by Michael Gustafson, Oliver Uberti
on March 27, 2018
Pages: 160
Published by Grand Central Publishing
Genres: Non-Fiction
Goodreads

When Michael Gustafson and his wife Hilary opened Literati Bookstore in Ann Arbor, Michigan, they put out a typewriter for anyone to use. They had no idea what to expect. Would people ask metaphysical questions? Write mean things? Pour their souls onto the page? Yes, no, and did they ever.

Every day, people of all ages sit down at the public typewriter. Children perch atop grandparents' knees, both sets of hands hovering above the metal keys: I LOVE YOU. Others walk in alone on Friday nights and confess their hopes: I will find someone someday. And some leave funny asides for the next person who sits down: I dislike people, misanthropes, irony, and ellipses ... and lists too.

In NOTES FROM A PUBLIC TYPEWRITER Michael and designer Oliver Uberti have combined their favorite notes with essays and photos to create an ode to community and the written word that will surprise, delight, and inspire.

My Takeaway “Life, like this typewriter, has no backspace. Type strongly and don’t look back.” Notes from a Public Typewriter Occasionally, a book comes along you simply fall in love with and folks, we have a winner here! I learned about Notes from a Public Typewriter…

Book Review: Americanah

Book Review: AmericanahAmericanah
by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
on March 4, 2014
Pages: 589
Published by Anchor
Genres: Literary Fiction, Multicultural
Goodreads

As teenagers in Lagos, Ifemelu and Obinze fall in love. Their Nigeria is under military dictatorship, and people are fleeing the country if they can. The self-assured Ifemelu departs for America. There she suffers defeats and triumphs, finds and loses relationships, all the while feeling the weight of something she never thought of back home: race. Obinze had hoped to join her, but post-9/11 America will not let him in, and he plunges into a dangerous, undocumented life in London.

Thirteen years later, Obinze is a wealthy man in a newly democratic Nigeria, while Ifemelu has achieved success as a blogger. But after so long apart and so many changes, will they find the courage to meet again, face to face?

Fearless, gripping, spanning three continents and numerous lives, Americanah is a richly told story of love and expectation set in today’s globalized world.

My Takeaway “I came from a country where race was not an issue; I did not think of myself as black and I only became black when I came to America.” Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Americanah First, it took me a little over a month to finish this book. Ridiculous &#8212…