Book Review: Hunger

Book Review: HungerHunger: A Memoir of (My) Body
by Roxane Gay
on July 6, 2017
Pages: 280
Published by Corsair
Genres: Diverse Spines, Memoir, Non-Fiction
Goodreads

From the bestselling author of Bad Feminist: a searingly honest memoir of food, weight, self-image, and learning how to feed your hunger while taking care of yourself

I ate and ate and ate in the hopes that if I made myself big, my body would be safe. I buried the girl I was because she ran into all kinds of trouble. I tried to erase every memory of her, but she is still there, somewhere. . . . I was trapped in my body, one that I barely recognized or understood, but at least I was safe.

In her phenomenally popular essays and long-running Tumblr blog, Roxane Gay has written with intimacy and sensitivity about food and body, using her own emotional and psychological struggles as a means of exploring our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance, and health. As a woman who describes her own body as “wildly undisciplined,” Roxane understands the tension between desire and denial, between self-comfort and self-care. In Hunger, she explores her own past—including the devastating act of violence that acted as a turning point in her young life—and brings readers along on her journey to understand and ultimately save herself.

With the bracing candor, vulnerability, and power that have made her one of the most admired writers of her generation, Roxane explores what it means to learn to take care of yourself: how to feed your hungers for delicious and satisfying food, a smaller and safer body, and a body that can love and be loved—in a time when the bigger you are, the smaller your world becomes.

My Takeaway “This is a memoir of (my) body because, more often than not, stories of bodies like mine are ignored or dismissed or derided. People see bodies like mine and make their assumptions. They think they know the why of my body. They do not.” Roxane Gay…

Vacation Mode

Hi guys! I was on vacation (Dominican Republic) for the past two weeks and although I’m officially back to work, I’m still mentally on vacation mode! Sadly, I did not read as much as I thought I would (took five books with me), but I did…

Book Review: The Sun Does Shine

Book Review: The Sun Does ShineThe Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row
by Anthony Ray Hinton, Bryan Stevenson, Lara Love Hardin
on March 27, 2018
Pages: 272
Published by St. Martin's Press
Genres: Non-Fiction
Goodreads

OPRAH’S BOOK CLUB SUMMER 2018 SELECTION

In 1985, Anthony Ray Hinton was arrested and charged with two counts of capital murder in Alabama. Stunned, confused, and only twenty-nine years old, Hinton knew that it was a case of mistaken identity and believed that the truth would prove his innocence and ultimately set him free.

But with no money and a different system of justice for a poor black man in the South, Hinton was sentenced to death by electrocution. He spent his first three years on Death Row at Holman State Prison in agonizing silence—full of despair and anger toward all those who had sent an innocent man to his death. But as Hinton realized and accepted his fate, he resolved not only to survive, but find a way to live on Death Row. For the next twenty-seven years he was a beacon—transforming not only his own spirit, but those of his fellow inmates, fifty-four of whom were executed mere feet from his cell. With the help of civil rights attorney and bestselling author of Just Mercy, Bryan Stevenson, Hinton won his release in 2015.

With a foreword by Stevenson, The Sun Does Shine is an extraordinary testament to the power of hope sustained through the darkest times. Destined to be a classic memoir of wrongful imprisonment and freedom won, Hinton’s memoir tells his dramatic thirty-year journey and shows how you can take away a man’s freedom, but you can’t take away his imagination, humor, or joy.

My Takeaway “I was born with the same gift from God we are all born with – the impulse to reach out and lessen the suffering of another human being. It was a gift, and we each had a choice whether to use this gift or not.” Anthony Ray Hinton, The…

Book Review: The Woman in the Window

Book Review: The Woman in the WindowThe Woman in the Window
by A.J. Finn
on January 2, 2018
Pages: 427
Published by William Morrow
Genres: Fiction, Suspense/Thriller
Goodreads

Anna Fox lives alone—a recluse in her New York City home, unable to venture outside. She spends her day drinking wine (maybe too much), watching old movies, recalling happier times . . . and spying on her neighbors.

Then the Russells move into the house across the way: a father, a mother, their teenage son. The perfect family. But when Anna, gazing out her window one night, sees something she shouldn’t, her world begins to crumble—and its shocking secrets are laid bare.

What is real? What is imagined? Who is in danger? Who is in control? In this diabolically gripping thriller, no one—and nothing—is what it seems.

My Takeaway “Watching is like nature photography. You don’t interfere with the wildlife.” A.J. Finn, The Woman in the Window I thoroughly enjoyed The Woman in the Window. Kudos to Finn for a fantastic and winning debut! This thriller has suspense, drama, lies, and an unreliable narrator. Anna…

Book Review: Where the Red Fern Grows

Book Review: Where the Red Fern GrowsWhere the Red Fern Grows
by Wilson Rawls
on September 17, 1996
Pages: 212
Published by Yearling Books
Genres: Fiction, Young Readers
Goodreads

Billy has long dreamt of owning not one, but two dogs. So when he’s finally able to save up enough money for two pups to call his own—Old Dan and Little Ann—he’s ecstatic. It’s true that times are tough, but together they’ll roam the hills of the Ozarks.

Soon Billy and his hounds become the finest hunting team in the valley. Stories of their great achievements spread throughout the region, and the combination of Old Dan’s brawn, Little Ann’s brains, and Billy’s sheer will seems unbeatable. But tragedy awaits these determined hunters—now friends—and Billy learns that hope can grow out of despair.

My Takeaway “It’s not easy for a young boy to want a dog and not be able to have one.” Wilson Rawls, Where the Red Fern Grows As a girl, I never had the opportunity to read Where the Red Fern Grows, but thanks to The…