Book Review: Pachinko

Book Review: PachinkoPachinko
by Min Jin Lee
Pages: 490
Published by Grand Central Publishing
Genres: Literary Fiction, Multicultural
Goodreads

Pachinko follows one Korean family through the generations, beginning in early 1900s Korea with Sunja, the prized daughter of a poor yet proud family, whose unplanned pregnancy threatens to shame them all. Deserted by her lover, Sunja is saved when a young tubercular minister offers to marry and bring her to Japan.

So begins a sweeping saga of an exceptional family in exile from its homeland and caught in the indifferent arc of history. Through desperate struggles and hard-won triumphs, its members are bound together by deep roots as they face enduring questions of faith, family, and identity.

My Takeaway 

“Living everyday in the presence of those who refuse to acknowledge your humanity takes great courage.” Min Jin Lee, Pachinko

What an amazing, enjoyable and unforgettable book! Pachinko is a page-turner and beautifully written. The cover of the book is brilliant and spectacular as well (I love it). It features a picture of an actual pachinko, which is a popular Japanese form of pinball. From the beginning, I was fascinated by the complex, yet memorable characters. The novel follows the lives of several generations of Koreans living in Japan. Prior to reading this book I had no idea how tough life can be for Koreans in Japan. They are constantly discriminated against, insulted and dishonored (and that’s just the tip of the iceberg). Lee does an excellent job and gives an honest, candid view of the characters’ insurmountable struggles and small triumphs. I recommend this book to fans of The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini.

Thank you NetGalley and Grand Central Publishing for providing me an ARC of the book in exchange for my honest opinion. I enjoyed this book so much, I went and bought myself a copy. 🙂

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