Book Review: The House of the Spirits

Book Review: The House of the SpiritsLa Casa de Los Espiritus
by Isabel Allende
on January 3, 2017
Pages: 560
Published by Vintage Espanol
Genres: Libros en Español, Literary Fiction, Magical Realism, Multicultural
Goodreads

In one of the most important and beloved Latin American works of the twentieth century, Isabel Allende weaves a luminous tapestry of three generations of the Trueba family, revealing both triumphs and tragedies.

Here is patriarch Esteban, whose wild desires and political machinations are tempered only by his love for his ethereal wife, Clara, a woman touched by an otherworldly hand. Their daughter, Blanca, whose forbidden love for a man Esteban has deemed unworthy infuriates her father, yet will produce his greatest joy: his granddaughter Alba, a beautiful, ambitious girl who will lead the family and their country into a revolutionary future.

The House of the Spirits is an enthralling saga that spans decades and lives, twining the personal and the political into an epic novel of love, magic, and fate.

Mi Punto de Vista “Esa noche creí que había perdido para siempre la capacidad de enamorarme, que nunca más podría reírme ni perseguir una ilusión. Pero nunca más es mucho tiempo.” La casa de los espíritus, Isabel Allende La casa de los esp…

Book Review: Americanah

Book Review: AmericanahAmericanah
by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
on March 4, 2014
Pages: 589
Published by Anchor
Genres: Literary Fiction, Multicultural
Goodreads

As teenagers in Lagos, Ifemelu and Obinze fall in love. Their Nigeria is under military dictatorship, and people are fleeing the country if they can. The self-assured Ifemelu departs for America. There she suffers defeats and triumphs, finds and loses relationships, all the while feeling the weight of something she never thought of back home: race. Obinze had hoped to join her, but post-9/11 America will not let him in, and he plunges into a dangerous, undocumented life in London.

Thirteen years later, Obinze is a wealthy man in a newly democratic Nigeria, while Ifemelu has achieved success as a blogger. But after so long apart and so many changes, will they find the courage to meet again, face to face?

Fearless, gripping, spanning three continents and numerous lives, Americanah is a richly told story of love and expectation set in today’s globalized world.

My Takeaway “I came from a country where race was not an issue; I did not think of myself as black and I only became black when I came to America.” Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Americanah First, it took me a little over a month to finish this book. Ridiculous &#8212…

Book Review: An American Marriage

Book Review: An American MarriageAn American Marriage
by Tayari Jones
on February 6th 2018
Pages: 320
Published by Algonquin Books
Genres: Literary Fiction, Multicultural
Goodreads

Named an Oprah’s Book Club Selection.

Newlyweds Celestial and Roy are the embodiment of both the American Dream and the New South. He is a young executive, and she is an artist on the brink of an exciting career. But as they settle into the routine of their life together, they are ripped apart by circumstances neither could have imagined. Roy is arrested and sentenced to twelve years for a crime Celestial knows he didn’t commit. Though fiercely independent, Celestial finds herself bereft and unmoored, taking comfort in Andre, her childhood friend, and best man at their wedding. As Roy’s time in prison passes, she is unable to hold on to the love that has been her center. After five years, Roy’s conviction is suddenly overturned, and he returns to Atlanta ready to resume their life together.

My Takeaway “Human emotion is beyond comprehension, smooth and uninterrupted, like an orb made of blown glass.” Tayari Jones, An American Marriage An American Marriage is worthy and amazing! Jones is a poetic, phenomenal, and captivating writer (the hype is real mi gente). Caution: the novel will weave…

Book Review: The Stolen Marriage

Book Review: The Stolen MarriageThe Stolen Marriage
by Diane Chamberlain
on October 3, 2017
Pages: 384
Published by St. Martin's Press
Genres: Fiction, Literary Fiction
Goodreads

In 1944, twenty-three-year-old Tess DeMello abruptly ends her engagement to the love of her life when she marries a mysterious stranger and moves to Hickory, North Carolina, a small town struggling with racial tension and the hardships imposed by World War II. Tess’s new husband, Henry Kraft, is a secretive man who often stays out all night, hides money from his new wife, and shows no interest in making love. Tess quickly realizes she’s trapped in a strange and loveless marriage with no way out.

The people of Hickory love and respect Henry and see Tess as an outsider, treating her with suspicion and disdain, especially after one of the town’s prominent citizens dies in a terrible accident and Tess is blamed. Tess suspects people are talking about her, plotting behind her back, and following her as she walks around town. What does everyone know about Henry that she does not? Feeling alone and adrift, Tess turns to the one person who seems to understand her, a local medium who gives her hope but seems to know more than he’s letting on.

When a sudden polio epidemic strikes the town, the townspeople band together to build a polio hospital. Tess, who has a nursing degree, bucks Henry’s wishes and begins to work at the hospital, finding meaning in nursing the young victims. Yet at home, Henry’s actions grow more alarming by the day. As Tess works to save the lives of her patients, can she untangle her husband’s mysterious behavior and save her own life?

My Takeaway “Even though I couldn’t have him or touch him or talk to him or even look into his eyes. I needed his presence. I needed him close by.” Diane Chamberlain, The Stolen Marriage You know a book is good when you contemplate taking the day…

Book Review: The Invisible Life of Euridice Gusmao

Book Review: The Invisible Life of Euridice GusmaoThe Invisible Life of Euridice Gusmao
by Martha Batalha, Eric M B Becker
on October 10th 2017
Pages: 240
Published by ONEWorld Publications
Genres: Fiction, Literary Fiction, Multicultural
Goodreads

Euridice is young, beautiful and ambitious, but when her rebellious sister Guida elopes, she sets her own aspirations aside and vows to settle down as a model wife and daughter. And yet as her husband's professional success grows, so does Euridice's feeling of restlessness. She embarks on a series of secret projects - from creating recipe books to becoming the most sought-after seamstress in town - but each is doomed to failure. Her tradition-loving husband is not interested in an independent wife. And then one day Guida appears at the door with her young son and a terrible story of hardship and abandonment. The Invisible Life of Euridice Gusmao is a wildly inventive, wickedly funny and keenly observed tale of two sisters who, surrounded by a cast of unforgettable characters, assert their independence and courageously carve a path of their own in 1940s Rio de Janeiro. A deeply human and truly unforgettable novel from one of the most exciting new voices in world literature.

My Takeaway “When Euridice set her mind to something, the rest of the world became smoke.” The Invisible Life of Euridice Gusmao, Martha Batalha, (Translated by Eric M.B. Becker) The Invisible Life of Euridice Gusmao is a humorous and quirky novel. What originally caught my attention was…