Book Review: Notes from a Public Typewriter

Book Review: Notes from a Public TypewriterNotes from a Public Typewriter
by Michael Gustafson, Oliver Uberti
on March 27, 2018
Pages: 160
Published by Grand Central Publishing
Genres: Non-Fiction
Goodreads

When Michael Gustafson and his wife Hilary opened Literati Bookstore in Ann Arbor, Michigan, they put out a typewriter for anyone to use. They had no idea what to expect. Would people ask metaphysical questions? Write mean things? Pour their souls onto the page? Yes, no, and did they ever.

Every day, people of all ages sit down at the public typewriter. Children perch atop grandparents' knees, both sets of hands hovering above the metal keys: I LOVE YOU. Others walk in alone on Friday nights and confess their hopes: I will find someone someday. And some leave funny asides for the next person who sits down: I dislike people, misanthropes, irony, and ellipses ... and lists too.

In NOTES FROM A PUBLIC TYPEWRITER Michael and designer Oliver Uberti have combined their favorite notes with essays and photos to create an ode to community and the written word that will surprise, delight, and inspire.

My Takeaway “Life, like this typewriter, has no backspace. Type strongly and don’t look back.” Notes from a Public Typewriter Occasionally, a book comes along you simply fall in love with and folks, we have a winner here! I learned about Notes from a Public Typewriter…

Book Review: Small Hours

Book Review: Small HoursSmall Hours
by Jennifer Kitses
on June 13th 2017
Pages: 288
Published by Grand Central Publishing
Genres: Fiction
Goodreads

In a story that unfolds over the course of a single day, a husband and wife try to outrun the secrets that threaten their marriage, sending their lives spiraling out of control.

On the edge of the economic downturn, Helen and Tom fled New York for what they’d hoped would be a fresh start: a small home in a former mill town, where they could raise their twin daughters away from the pressures of the city. But two years later, their fragile equilibrium has hit a breaking point. One September morning, Helen begins to lose control. Exhausted from juggling ambitions, frustrations, and unrealistic expectations, she snaps — and finds herself drawn into a violent conflict with two local teenagers. Unaware of her danger, in a Manhattan office seventy miles away, Tom is facing a crisis of his own at his high-pressure newsroom job — and struggling to hide a second, secret life.

My Takeaway  Relationships cannot flourish without communication and it’s clear Tom and Helen missed the memo. The couple does not communicate and withholds important information from one another (they don’t appear to be compatible). Helen has serious anger issues and Tom has a secret life. It…

Book Review: Pachinko

Book Review: PachinkoPachinko
by Min Jin Lee
on February 7th 2017
Pages: 490
Published by Grand Central Publishing
Genres: Literary Fiction, Multicultural
Goodreads

Pachinko follows one Korean family through the generations, beginning in early 1900s Korea with Sunja, the prized daughter of a poor yet proud family, whose unplanned pregnancy threatens to shame them all. Deserted by her lover, Sunja is saved when a young tubercular minister offers to marry and bring her to Japan.

So begins a sweeping saga of an exceptional family in exile from its homeland and caught in the indifferent arc of history. Through desperate struggles and hard-won triumphs, its members are bound together by deep roots as they face enduring questions of faith, family, and identity.

My Takeaway  “Living everyday in the presence of those who refuse to acknowledge your humanity takes great courage.” Min Jin Lee, Pachinko What an amazing, enjoyable and unforgettable book! Pachinko is a page-turner and beautifully written. The cover of the book is brilliant and spectacular as well (I love…