Book Review: The Woman in the Window

Book Review: The Woman in the WindowThe Woman in the Window
by A.J. Finn
on January 2, 2018
Pages: 427
Published by William Morrow
Genres: Fiction, Suspense/Thriller
Goodreads

Anna Fox lives alone—a recluse in her New York City home, unable to venture outside. She spends her day drinking wine (maybe too much), watching old movies, recalling happier times . . . and spying on her neighbors.

Then the Russells move into the house across the way: a father, a mother, their teenage son. The perfect family. But when Anna, gazing out her window one night, sees something she shouldn’t, her world begins to crumble—and its shocking secrets are laid bare.

What is real? What is imagined? Who is in danger? Who is in control? In this diabolically gripping thriller, no one—and nothing—is what it seems.

My Takeaway “Watching is like nature photography. You don’t interfere with the wildlife.” A.J. Finn, The Woman in the Window I thoroughly enjoyed The Woman in the Window. Kudos to Finn for a fantastic and winning debut! This thriller has suspense, drama, lies, and an unreliable narrator. Anna…

Book Review: Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows

Book Review: Erotic Stories for Punjabi WidowsErotic Stories for Punjabi Widows
by Balli Kaur Jaswal
on June 13th 2017
Pages: 304
Published by William Morrow
Genres: Literary Fiction, Multicultural
Goodreads

A lively, sexy, and thought-provoking East-meets-West story about community, friendship, and women’s lives at all ages—a spicy and alluring mix of Together Tea and Calendar Girls.

Every woman has a secret life . . .

Nikki lives in cosmopolitan West London, where she tends bar at the local pub. The daughter of Indian immigrants, she’s spent most of her twenty-odd years distancing herself from the traditional Sikh community of her childhood, preferring a more independent (that is, Western) life. When her father’s death leaves the family financially strapped, Nikki, a law school dropout, impulsively takes a job teaching a "creative writing" course at the community center in the beating heart of London’s close-knit Punjabi community.

Because of a miscommunication, the proper Sikh widows who show up are expecting to learn basic English literacy, not the art of short-story writing. When one of the widows finds a book of sexy stories in English and shares it with the class, Nikki realizes that beneath their white dupattas, her students have a wealth of fantasies and memories. Eager to liberate these modest women, she teaches them how to express their untold stories, unleashing creativity of the most unexpected—and exciting—kind.

My Takeaway  I absolutely loved this book and its gorgeous cover!! Some parts were heartbreaking, but for the most part, I was smiling or laughing. I adored the characters — especially the widows. Jaswal’s writing is unique, witty and quite entertaining. The book transported me to Southall with…