Book Review: Hunger

Book Review: HungerHunger: A Memoir of (My) Body
by Roxane Gay
on July 6, 2017
Pages: 280
Published by Corsair
Genres: Diverse Spines, Memoir, Non-Fiction
Goodreads

From the bestselling author of Bad Feminist: a searingly honest memoir of food, weight, self-image, and learning how to feed your hunger while taking care of yourself

I ate and ate and ate in the hopes that if I made myself big, my body would be safe. I buried the girl I was because she ran into all kinds of trouble. I tried to erase every memory of her, but she is still there, somewhere. . . . I was trapped in my body, one that I barely recognized or understood, but at least I was safe.

In her phenomenally popular essays and long-running Tumblr blog, Roxane Gay has written with intimacy and sensitivity about food and body, using her own emotional and psychological struggles as a means of exploring our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance, and health. As a woman who describes her own body as “wildly undisciplined,” Roxane understands the tension between desire and denial, between self-comfort and self-care. In Hunger, she explores her own past—including the devastating act of violence that acted as a turning point in her young life—and brings readers along on her journey to understand and ultimately save herself.

With the bracing candor, vulnerability, and power that have made her one of the most admired writers of her generation, Roxane explores what it means to learn to take care of yourself: how to feed your hungers for delicious and satisfying food, a smaller and safer body, and a body that can love and be loved—in a time when the bigger you are, the smaller your world becomes.

My Takeaway

“This is a memoir of (my) body because, more often than not, stories of bodies like mine are ignored or dismissed or derided. People see bodies like mine and make their assumptions. They think they know the why of my body. They do not.”
Roxane Gay, Hunger

Hunger was raw, unfiltered, explicit, heartbreaking and extremely personal. There are a few explicit parts that were hard to read because they were so graphic, still, Gay’s writing was phenomenal and incredibly honest. In this memoir, Gay articulately expressed her struggles with her weight, body, and self-image after being gang-raped at the age of 12. I can’t praise Gay enough for being so brave and honest. Hunger definitely changed some of the misconceptions and views I held about overweight individuals. I highly recommend this book – especially to those who struggle with their body image. I had the pleasure and honor of meeting Roxane this past June. She was extremely funny, witty and quite shy!

 

Leave A Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.